Author Proposes Island Of Liberty

Dave Killion — March 19, 2013

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As libertarians continue to battle statism in what has become a new Cold War, another proposal for a libertarian, free-market enclave has been forwarded.  A new novel suggests a charter city, but with a twist; build it smack-dab in America’s heartland

“…  despite all the efforts of many good people, (Detroit) has lost most of its population and is now the poorest, most dangerous, most run down city in America.

Detroit needs a game changer.  The 982 acre island of Belle Isle can be that game changer for Detroit.  The book Belle Isle is about that vision.

The setting is Belle Isle, 30 years in the future.  Twenty nine years prior (2014), Belle Isle was sold by the city of Detroit for $1 billion dollars to a group of investors who believed in individual freedom, liberty and free markets.
They formed their own city-state, with innovative systems of government, taxation, labor and money.  People soon came from all over the world to be part of this culture of unlimited opportunity.  Belle Isle became the “Midwest Tiger,” rivaling Singapore as an economic miracle.  Although numbering only 35,000 citizens, it generated billions of dollars in desperately needed economic growth and became a social laboratory for the western world.”

As of this writing, “Belle Isle has an average customer review of 3.5/5 at Amazon.com, with only two negative reviews. Both negative reviews come from people who have not read the book, but rather simply don’t like the idea. Well, Detroit is facing some big problems, and there are a lot of other U.S. cities lining up to follow them down the same path. Under the circumstances, it’s probably wise to consider trying out even those ideas you might not like.

Comments

Ashley says

You would at least think they would want their enemies to try ideas they didn’t think would work.

— March 22, 2013

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