Making Crawling Easier

Dave Killion — May 13, 2013

On the last episode I saw of The Stossel Show, author Lenore Skenazy (“Free Range Kids“) did something that had me racing to her blog -

“ When I go around giving my Free-Range Kids lectures, at some point I hold up a pair of little knit things that look like mini sweat bands and I ask the audience, “What are these?” And when I finally inform them, “Baby knee pads,” they shriek in disbelief. (At least, the ones who aren’t shrieking, “My mother-in-law just gave us those!”)

Since when do kids need knee pads to crawl safely? Aren’t babies born with built-in knee pads called “baby fat”? Isn’t that why their knees adorably dimple?”

Full post here. If, like me, you think baby knee pads are something that few parents would be interested in, I encourage you to do an internet search on them. You will find they are widely offered.

If ever there was a metaphor for the way our culture deals with difficulty, baby knee pads is it. There are a symbol of the way that every challenge is softened, every adversity removed. What are the effects of this sort of molly-coddling? I can’t say for sure, but so long as crawling is made more comfortable, the longer I would expect a baby to crawl. This is not the sort of product in which I expect libertarians to be very interested. We much rather people learn to stand on their own two feet.

Comments

Lenore Skenazy says

So glad Stossel had me on and so glad you caught the segment. I am continually shocked by how “good parents” are expected — exhorted — to treat their kids as weak and vulnerable. The basic idea today is that kids cannot do anything safely or successfully without a lot of help (and classes and laws and products). Fight the idea that this generation of kids is so uber-needy!! And thanks for the shout out! Lenore “Free-Range Kids” herself!

— May 14, 2013

Earth.W says

I don’t think this is what society expected under the concept of the community raising of the child.

— May 14, 2013

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